Florida’s Top High Schools

U.S. News and World Report high school rankings are out.  Thirteen Florida schools made the top 100.  To achieve that ranking, data is collected on the state reading and math scores.  Schools that perform better than expected are identified.  This includes disadvantaged students who score better than the state average for comparable groups e.g. minority and low income groups.  The college readiness index include students’ scores on AP tests. Graduation rates are also factored into the rankings.

Rankings never tell the whole story.  The list below gives the national rank for Florida’s top schools along with the percentage of students who qualify for free and reduced lunch.   If you go to the U.S. News and World Report site, you can click on each school to get a glimpse of their curriculum.  Note how innovative most schools seem to be.  Note also that only two of the thirteen top Florida schools are charters.

 

 

 

 

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Politifact: Bush is Mostly Wrong

Jeb Bush is pushing privatization in New Hampshire.  In this latest move, all parents would receive a voucher to attend a school of choice–private or public.  Bush argues that competition from vouchers make public schools better.  He cites research in Florida conducted by David Figlio.  Figlio himself says that the number of students he studied was small, and it makes sense that public schools were able to make modest gains because they had not lost that much revenue.

(In the long run, public schools had lost some low achieving students to private, small and mostly religious schools in early grades, half of whom in middle school, returned.)

 

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Be Aware: Don’t be shut out

Why are the House and Senate education committees operating differently this year?  There has been relatively little discussion about differences in the policies offered by each chamber.  All of a sudden, bills in the Senate have replaced House  bills.  There are no committee hearings open to the public on these changes.  Instead, the House and Senate bills go to the conference committee that includes leaders from each chamber.  They negotiate the final bills in secret.

The Miami Herald published an article questioning this approach.  They are skeptical that any real input from the public will be heard.

The differences in policy have huge financial impact.  For example:

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McKay kids lose their rights

Parents of children with disabilities learn some lessons the hard way.  When children leave public school with the McKay Scholarships, children lose their rights under the federal Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA).  Parents may have from $5,000 to $23,000 in tuition vouchers, but private schools are not accountable for the money provided.  In today’s New York Times, Dana Goldstein explains.

IDEA rights lost for students in private schools include:

 

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Separate and Unequal Destruction

Schools of Hope is the latest panacea in Florida for economically and racially segregated schools.  Low performing schools can either be closed or turned into charters.  These charters, called Schools of Hope would be run by charters like KIPP that operate no-nonsense schools in low income areas.  Students who survive the harsh discipline policies can do well.  The others, often as many as forty percent of students, are counseled  to leave school.  What happens to these students?

 

 

 

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Increase FSA passing standards?

Senate bill SB 926 contains a phrase that changes the name of the level 3 on the FSA from ‘satisfactory’ to ‘proficient’.  What does that mean?  Amendment # 351834 was filed to find out.

It asks the Commissioner of Education to study achievement levels and their relationship to student performance and success.  The Commissioner is charged to recommend changes in the meaning of the achievement levels to the Governor and the Speaker, the President of the Senate and the State Board of Education by July 2018.

This is the procedure that is required in existing law to change performance standards on the FSA.  It has been tried before.  What would the approximate impact be?

 

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Compromise reached in Senate to improve testing bill

Flores’ bill regarding state assessment requirements has several amendments that improve the bill.  The bill now includes several of Senator Montford’s bill to reduce testing  in schools.  The bill:
1.  use of value added model optional
2.  eliminates EOC requirement for Algebra II, Geometry, US History and Civics
3.  removes change from ‘satisfactory to proficiency’ language for the level three assessment score.
4.  developmental milestones for preschool education
There are 13 amendments that come up today at 1:30 in the Education Committee.    The changes in this bill are in response to the concerns that Senator Simmons had with regard to the manner in which some members of the committee ‘borrowed’ provisions included in Senator Montford’s bill to improve testing policy.

Supreme Court Supports Standards for Students with Disabilities

Are schools expected to do more than provide minimum educational standards for students with special needs.  According to this report, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that students with disabilities must be given the opportunity to make ‘appropriately ambitious progress’ consistent with federal law.

Approximately thirteen percent of all children between 3-21 have some type of disability.  Complaints that students are given minimal academic standards triggered the lawsuit.  In this case, Endrew v. Douglas, Endrew was a fifth grade autistic boy whose IEP plan had not changed from one year to the next.  The family withdrew him from public school and enrolled him in a private school where he did make progress.  The family then sued for tuition reimbursement.

Senate Education Committee Meetings Tuesday at 4pm: Watch

Senator Hukill’s Education Committee meets at 4pm Tuesday, March 21 to consider these bills on the agenda:

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There is an education workshop tomorrow at 4pm to consider Senator Montford’s accountability bill.  This is a strong bill that reduces testing and eliminates several accountability measures. It disconnects teacher evaluations and test score gains.  Click here

To watch these sessions online Click here.