Florida School Grades: Fewer ‘F’ Schools. WHY?

dmbtestMiami-Dade has half the number of schools rated ‘F’ this year than last.  No, they did not give kids extra vitamins.  The State of Florida changed the definition of learning gains.

I think I like the change even if I do not the idea of test based accountability.  Here’s why.

 

 

 

 

  • The formula is much simpler.  The old system penalized schools by lowering school grades for failing to make arbitrary targets, and it gave bonus points that were easy to manipulate.
  • The system is somewhat less punitive.  Now school grades are based on the percentage of students making learning gains.  In the past, an at risk child’s increase in achievement might not have shown up in school grades because their gain was less than the state required.  So, students who started school behind were making progress that did not count.

The new grading system has subdivided the two lowest proficiency levels.  Level one scores are grouped in low, medium and high.  Level two is divided into low and high.  A child who scores at the same level but improves in the subcategory, from low to medium, for example, is counted as having made a learning gain.  The net effect reduces the number of failing schools.

Students scoring at or above proficiency level three must increase their test scores by at least one point the following year to be counted as a learning gain (unless they are already at a proficiency level of ‘5’).  The new school grade formula no longer provides bonus points.  There are now fewer schools with ‘A’ grades.

It may still seem like smoke and mirrors.  Achievement did not change, but the school grades did.  It reminds me of the marks on the wall I used to make as my children grew.  Most years the growth from one year to the next was about the same.  Once in awhile there would be a growth spurt.  The same was true for their achievement.  I did not need to measure the kids except to see if they met the height requirement at Disney attractions or were they ready for some accelerated academic program.

Annual testing tells us what we already know.  If you want to increase the school grades, change the formula.   There has to be a better way.

 

 

 

 

http://www.miamiherald.com/opinion/editorials/article89947977.html

 

http://www.fldoe.org/core/fileparse.php/5637/urlt/AccoReportTechMeeting2016.pdf

It is Time to Talk about ESSA

child speakingThere is the law, and then there are the regulations to implement the law.  Some say the new federal Department of Education proposed regulations for the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) overstep the intention of the law.  They create more stringent rules about testing and accountability than the ESSA intended.  The Florida Department of Education has put out a call for your input about the regulations. You have until July 22, 2016 to respond.  Responding in a meaningful way takes some thought.

 

 

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Louisiana Charters Returned to District Control

mardi-gras-1176483_1280Following Hurricane Katrina, the New Orleans public schools were in disarray.  Thousands of people who had the resources to do so had left New Orleans.  No one was watching the store, and the State took over 52 poverty stricken schools.  Ten years later, the Louisiana legislature is finalizing a bill to return the Recovery District charters to local control by district school boards.  Did the great experiment work?

 

 

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California Appeals Court Denies Minimum Funding for Education

Two California lawsuits over inadequate funding for education were denied in a split decision.  No doubt both will be appealed to the California Supreme Court.  The judge agreed funding was inadequate.  The issue, he said, concerned the responsibility for making funding decisions.  The judiciary could not determine adequacy.

In Florida’s Citizens for Strong Schools, the plaintiffs requested a cost study to determine adequacy.  Whether the judge will rule that the cost study can be mandated by the court remains to be seen.

Education Week reports that there have been funding court cases in all but five states.  These cases take years to be resolved since many are appealed.  In 27 cases, the decision has favored the plaintiffs.

Appeals Court denies constitutional right to minimum K-12 funding

 

 

Model Legislation for School Reform: Bush Style

legislation1Want to know where much of the school reform legislation comes from?  Go to the Excellence in Education Foundation website.  The foundation was created by former Florida governor Jeb Bush in 2007-8. It is run by a former Bush deputy chief of staff, Patricia Levesque, whose husband is Florida Senate Counsel.  You can see model legislation that the foundation develops and also assists legislators who plan to introduce it.  Maybe you can, if you register.

 

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